Cowper Street

a method of 360 degree feedback in a very sweet format

cowperstreet:

AN OPEN LETTER FROM

THE GUY WHO DID 
THAT SWEARY WEBSITE

Like pretty much anyone on the progressive side of politics, I’m bitterly disappointed that Australian voters chose the LNP, and Tony Abbott as their Prime Minister. However, I think it’s important to acknowledge people’s right and choice in doing so. Some of my dearest friends vote conservative, and they are categorically not fucking idiots. They are, in my opinion, utterly and completely wrong in their views, their arguments are based on false premises, and their conclusions are post-hoc rationalised non-sequiturs and incoherent nonsense, but this does not diminish their humanity. The language of the dontbeafuckingidiot.com site was intended as a persuasive joke not a personal attack.

I believe strongly that our society should be a marketplace of ideas; that we should be free to challenge and exchange our thoughts and beliefs with others. Too often people avoid the subject matter of politics out of fear that it will create conflict, and so we settle for non-confrontational niceties. Or worse, we invoke the safe rhetoric of political disengagement in which we hold all politicians and political ideas to be equivalent: ‘They’re all as bad as each other’, we say. This is a mistake, and it has an insidious and destructive effect.

The strength of our democracy depends on our ability and will to engage with each other’s ideas. A culture of political disengagement, and tacit contempt for political ideas, actively inhibits progress and understanding. We roundly ignore politics and then wonder why political messaging becomes a tabloid circus of desperately simplistic soundbites and sensationalism. Well, it’s our own damned fault.

Politicians necessarily have to respond to the attitudes and beliefs of their constituency. What drives the vast majority of people into political life, on both sides, is a genuine belief in their ideals; and most of them despise having to compromise their idealism and passion for the sake of what will win the votes of people who are politically disengaged.

So, we need to be brave. We need to ignore the social convention that it is taboo to challenge other people’s ideas, or that questioning things is adversarial and rude. We need to be vulnerable enough to put our thoughts out there and engage with people honestly. We need to call out things we believe to be wrong. We need to stand up for what we believe to be right.

These next three years are going to be difficult for people on the progressive side of politics in Australia, but I implore you to not descend into personal attacks and hate. This may seem somewhat hypocritical for me to say in light of my sweary rant, but what I’m saying is that we should continue to have sweary rants about the government and politics, but when we’re talking to actual people, we need to convince them, not turn them off. We need to connect with them and persuade them that a progressive Australia is better than a conservative one. We need to make them believe that it would be fucking idiotic to vote for the LNP next time around.

I believe that the truth is on our side, but we need to have the courage to stand up for it.

Jesse Richardson, Brisbane.

Published under a creative commons CC BY-ND licence.

AN OPEN LETTER FROM

THE GUY WHO DID 
THAT SWEARY WEBSITE

Like pretty much anyone on the progressive side of politics, I’m bitterly disappointed that Australian voters chose the LNP, and Tony Abbott as their Prime Minister. However, I think it’s important to acknowledge people’s right and choice in doing so. Some of my dearest friends vote conservative, and they are categorically not fucking idiots. They are, in my opinion, utterly and completely wrong in their views, their arguments are based on false premises, and their conclusions are post-hoc rationalised non-sequiturs and incoherent nonsense, but this does not diminish their humanity. The language of the dontbeafuckingidiot.com site was intended as a persuasive joke not a personal attack.

I believe strongly that our society should be a marketplace of ideas; that we should be free to challenge and exchange our thoughts and beliefs with others. Too often people avoid the subject matter of politics out of fear that it will create conflict, and so we settle for non-confrontational niceties. Or worse, we invoke the safe rhetoric of political disengagement in which we hold all politicians and political ideas to be equivalent: ‘They’re all as bad as each other’, we say. This is a mistake, and it has an insidious and destructive effect.

The strength of our democracy depends on our ability and will to engage with each other’s ideas. A culture of political disengagement, and tacit contempt for political ideas, actively inhibits progress and understanding. We roundly ignore politics and then wonder why political messaging becomes a tabloid circus of desperately simplistic soundbites and sensationalism. Well, it’s our own damned fault.

Politicians necessarily have to respond to the attitudes and beliefs of their constituency. What drives the vast majority of people into political life, on both sides, is a genuine belief in their ideals; and most of them despise having to compromise their idealism and passion for the sake of what will win the votes of people who are politically disengaged.

So, we need to be brave. We need to ignore the social convention that it is taboo to challenge other people’s ideas, or that questioning things is adversarial and rude. We need to be vulnerable enough to put our thoughts out there and engage with people honestly. We need to call out things we believe to be wrong. We need to stand up for what we believe to be right.

These next three years are going to be difficult for people on the progressive side of politics in Australia, but I implore you to not descend into personal attacks and hate. This may seem somewhat hypocritical for me to say in light of my sweary rant, but what I’m saying is that we should continue to have sweary rants about the government and politics, but when we’re talking to actual people, we need to convince them, not turn them off. We need to connect with them and persuade them that a progressive Australia is better than a conservative one. We need to make them believe that it would be fucking idiotic to vote for the LNP next time around.

I believe that the truth is on our side, but we need to have the courage to stand up for it.

Jesse Richardson, Brisbane.

Published under a creative commons CC BY-ND licence.









My favourite things about this election campaign

Janet Rice got elected as our next Greens Senator for Victoria. JANET RICE GOT ELECTED! WOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOO!! And being part of her campaign has really piqued my interest in watching closely what the next Parliament of Australia gets up to.
Adam Bandt got re-elected as MP for Melbourne via the same people-powered grassroots campaign < outstanding result
As a support candidate on the Greens Senate ticket and as a campaign volunteer, I witnessed the campaign from many angles and gained many more reasons to support and build the Greens (I’m proud of how we’ve put the Party’s values and principles into smart, people-centred policies and campaigns)
For weeks and weeks I got to work very closely with Janet and Liz (her campaign manager), as well as a raft of other Greens who I have admired for years. I have learnt so much about styles of leadership and campaigning and was humbled to be part of something much, much bigger than myself.
I got to chat to dozens and dozens of Greens members and supporters to lend them a hand, and to hear their motivations for getting active (which helped reaffirm my own reasons) <3 The Greens really are a diverse and inclusive community.
I took many opportunities to speak to people about Greens policy in Vietnamese, and as a result I got to know myself better and learn more about my heritage and family’s refugee story – without that second-generation cringe I grew up with. I will be forever grateful for this particular aspect of this experience.
I got in touch with so many old friends, and so many got in touch with me, to get them involved with the Greens’ campaign (Some people are just waiting to be asked :D ).
I’ve been reduced to tears of joy thinking about how supportive and encouraging friends and family have been (especially my brothers and sisters). I feel so lucky to have been able to rearrange my life for this.
I got a proper break from my day job (« if I wasn’t such a formatting freak, I would underline that!). I really could not have gained this much perspective and breathing space without having that full break.
I got to have some spectacular battle time with my ego (as a candidate, and in undertaking campaign activities beyond my usual comfort zone) - I am much clearer about the style of activism I want to cultivate: neighbourly, upbeat and articulate.
I’m slowly becoming more confident in using my political voice, publicly and privately explaining why I stand with the Greens. And I have more mental space now to reflect on how I can best contribute to progressive politics.
I just got a call from a journalist from ABC’s Radio Australia’s Vietnamese language program wanting to interview me as a candidate of Vietnamese heritage… and it turns out she is my sister-in-law. One of the many crazy cool connections being part of this campaign has afforded me!
I scored dozens of new friends …and a Greens tee-shirt « the most comfy, ethically-sourced item of clothing one could possibly wear!



























In summary, I am so very grateful for this precious opportunity to get political, and reconnect with the people and issues that I care about so much. I really feel I’ve helped build (in a small but meaningful way) progressive politics in Australia. And I really want to keep doing this J
 
Photo (credit: mine): Roughly almost midnight on Election Night, we’re all sitting around watching the numbers with Janet and her beautiful family - numbers which keep looking better and better but remain too close to call that night. We’re all feeling good and happily supporting Janet.  

My favourite things about this election campaign

  1. Janet Rice got elected as our next Greens Senator for Victoria. JANET RICE GOT ELECTED! WOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOO!! And being part of her campaign has really piqued my interest in watching closely what the next Parliament of Australia gets up to.
  2. Adam Bandt got re-elected as MP for Melbourne via the same people-powered grassroots campaign < outstanding result
  3. As a support candidate on the Greens Senate ticket and as a campaign volunteer, I witnessed the campaign from many angles and gained many more reasons to support and build the Greens (I’m proud of how we’ve put the Party’s values and principles into smart, people-centred policies and campaigns)
  4. For weeks and weeks I got to work very closely with Janet and Liz (her campaign manager), as well as a raft of other Greens who I have admired for years. I have learnt so much about styles of leadership and campaigning and was humbled to be part of something much, much bigger than myself.
  5. I got to chat to dozens and dozens of Greens members and supporters to lend them a hand, and to hear their motivations for getting active (which helped reaffirm my own reasons) <3 The Greens really are a diverse and inclusive community.
  6. I took many opportunities to speak to people about Greens policy in Vietnamese, and as a result I got to know myself better and learn more about my heritage and family’s refugee story – without that second-generation cringe I grew up with. I will be forever grateful for this particular aspect of this experience.
  7. I got in touch with so many old friends, and so many got in touch with me, to get them involved with the Greens’ campaign (Some people are just waiting to be asked :D ).
  8. I’ve been reduced to tears of joy thinking about how supportive and encouraging friends and family have been (especially my brothers and sisters). I feel so lucky to have been able to rearrange my life for this.
  9. I got a proper break from my day job (« if I wasn’t such a formatting freak, I would underline that!). I really could not have gained this much perspective and breathing space without having that full break.
  10. I got to have some spectacular battle time with my ego (as a candidate, and in undertaking campaign activities beyond my usual comfort zone) - I am much clearer about the style of activism I want to cultivate: neighbourly, upbeat and articulate.
  11. I’m slowly becoming more confident in using my political voice, publicly and privately explaining why I stand with the Greens. And I have more mental space now to reflect on how I can best contribute to progressive politics.
  12. I just got a call from a journalist from ABC’s Radio Australia’s Vietnamese language program wanting to interview me as a candidate of Vietnamese heritage… and it turns out she is my sister-in-law. One of the many crazy cool connections being part of this campaign has afforded me!
  13. I scored dozens of new friends …and a Greens tee-shirt « the most comfy, ethically-sourced item of clothing one could possibly wear!

In summary, I am so very grateful for this precious opportunity to get political, and reconnect with the people and issues that I care about so much. I really feel I’ve helped build (in a small but meaningful way) progressive politics in Australia. And I really want to keep doing this J

 

Photo (credit: mine): Roughly almost midnight on Election Night, we’re all sitting around watching the numbers with Janet and her beautiful family - numbers which keep looking better and better but remain too close to call that night. We’re all feeling good and happily supporting Janet.  

tinhan123:

Matsuoka Gou x Posemaniacs!

tinhan123:

Matsuoka Gou x Posemaniacs!